what are the phases of wound healing
What Are the Phases of Wound Healing?

What Are the Phases of Wound Healing?

There are four wound healing phases that every wound goes through, including:

  • 1. Hemostasis
  • 2. Inflammation
  • 3. Proliferation
  • 4. Maturation

When you injure your skin, your body kicks off this healing process right away and begins to repair the damaged tissue. Different types and sizes of wounds take longer to heal than others, but they all go through the same healing stages.

 

 


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Phase 1: Hemostasis

The objective of the hemostasis phase of wound healing is to stop any bleeding. To do so, your body activates its blood clotting system. When your blood clots at the opening of a wound, it prevents you from losing too much blood and it is the first step of your wound closing up.

 

This stage can last up to two days, depending on how deep your wound is.

Phase 1: Hemostasis

Phase 2: Inflammation

Once phase one is complete and your body is no longer bleeding, your body activates its key defence mechanism – inflammation.

 

This phase works to kill bacteria and remove debris with white and other blood cells. Inflammation ensures that your wound is clean and ready for new tissue to start growing.

 

This phase can be the most painful of all. It is often when you’ll notice some reddening, heat and pain as your blood rushes to the wound to clean it. Inflammation generally takes up to six days and should go away.

 

If you experience excessive pain, heat and/or reddening (all signs of your inflammation response working in overdrive), your wound could have become infected. An infected wound can be dangerous, so always ask a doctor to take a look.

Phase 2: Inflammation

Phase 3: Proliferation

Once your wound is clean, your body will begin the proliferation phase of wound healing. This stage involves closing your wound.

 

Phase three can be broken down into three semi-phases, including:

  • 1. Filling the wound - with new connective tissue and blood vessels.
  • 2. Contracting the edges of the wound - this will feel like the wound is tightening towards the centre.
  • 3. Covering the wound - Epithelial cells (cells that create a protective barrier between the inside and outside of your body) flood in and multiply to close your wound completely.

 

This phase can last four days to almost a month, depending on the surface area of your wound.

Phase 3: Proliferation

Phase 4: Maturation

During this phase, the new tissue that your body built in phase three, needs to strengthen and build flexibility.

 

This stage can take the longest, sometimes taking over a year to fully repair. But, once fully recovered, your skin should be pretty close to as strong as it was before it was wounded.

Phase 4: Maturation

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The healing process is one of the body’s most extraordinary functions, but it can be delayed by aggravators like infection and poor wound care. It’s a smart idea to learn how to properly dress a wound so you can maximise your body’s ability to heal properly.

 

Heal your wound quickly by following these 3 key steps:

 

This process can help your wounds heal up to 2x faster and lower the risk of scarring.

 

Always read the label. Follow the instructions for use. If symptoms persist, talk to your health professional.


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Always see a doctor if the wound is deep, bleeds heavily or shows signs of infection like reddening, swelling or warmth. Please note that none of the above given tips or recommendations substitute medical advice. Carefully read the instructions for use given in our products' packages. Important: consult a health professional in case of any uncertainty of treating your wound properly.      

 

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS FOR USE. IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST, TALK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

 

For further information regarding Elastoplast products, please contact us via email on support.anz@elastoplast.com.au (AU and NZ). Carefully read the instructions for use given in our products' packages.

Although compiled with great care, please note that the tips and advice given on this website by no means substitute medical advice and treatment. If you have or suspect a health problem, consult a doctor and follow medical advice regardless of what you have learned on this website. Always read carefully and follow the instructions for use or the leaflets of our products. For further information about our products, please contact us here.

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS FOR USE. IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST, TALK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

What Are the Phases of Wound Healing?